Anybody can learn to code, but Apple’s Swift Playgrounds make them want to – Digital Trends https://t.co/I67eDcWTVj
Anybody can learn to code, but Apple’s Swift Playgrounds make them want to – Digital Trends #swainesworld https://t.co/I67eDcWTVj
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http://twitter.com/pragpub/status/744195810464661506


June 18, 2016 at 08:51AM
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Currently Reading: 50 Foods

The premise is intriguing: just 50 foods. Why those 50, specifically? Are these the best of all foods? And what’s a food, anyway? Just something you can pick or kill? That would eliminate anything processed, like bread or wine or cheese.

Whatever criteria Edward Behr used for deciding what foods to include in this 400-page celebration of foods, their varieties, selection, preparation, storage, and enjoyment, he has produced a tantalizing and satisfying read. And part of the fun of reading the book is deciding where you agree with his selections and what foods you would add or delete.

One proof that this is an idiosyncratic selection is that, out of 50 foods, Behr has seen fit to include six different cheeses. Over ten percent of the foods here are cheeses. I’m not suggesting that there’s anything wrong with that.

Behr is the founder of the food magazine The Art of Eating.

A Perl Classic — for $0.00

Modern Perl 4th Edition by chromatic is out now, and the price of the digital version is $0.00.

I must disclose that I was the editor for this edition. Actually, I’m bragging about it. I’m proud to be involved with this classic reference on the classic Swiss Army knife language. And “classic” in the case of this language doesn’t mean over the hill. As chromatic points out, modern Perl may well be the best tool for the job you have to get done. And at this price, what is there to keep you from finding out?

If you already know and appreciate Perl and Modern Perl, you might want to get the print edition. It isn’t free, but it’s worth the price, and chromatic isn’t going to make a lot on royalties from $0.00.

Open Source Car Software?

Open Source car software? I’m all for it. Well, with some caveats. I don’t think current car software should be open-sourced, since it’s probably full of security holes. Future car software should be, I think. But only if for the first year it is tested by the executives of the car companies in their own cars. If they survive attempts of black hats to take control of their cars and drive them into trees and off bridges, they can sell cars with the code in them. If they don’t, karma.

If I have a heritage, it’s this

“In Inisfail the fair there lies a land, the land of holy Michan. There rises a watchtower beheld by men afar. There sleep the mighty dead as in life they slept, warriors and princes of high renown. A pleasant land it is in sooth of murmuring waters, fishful streams where sport the gunnard, the plaice, the roach, the halibut, the gibbed haddock, the grilse, the dab, the brill, the flounder, the mixed coarse fish generally and other denizens of the aqueous kingdom too numerous to be enumerated.”

“Fishful.” Lovely.
“Too numerous to be enumerated.” Talking my language.
Then there’s the Melville-ish catalog of fishes.
Especially “the mixed coarse fish generally.”
And more subtly the sentence structure and rhythm around “streams where sport.”

You must taste this kind of writing, letting the alliteration of “In Iniasfail the fair there lies a land, the land…” tease the tip of your tongue: ananafathafathalasa lanthala…

Here’s an essentially dead language, Gaelic, thrusting its bones through the threads of ostensibly English prose. Rich and ripe.